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Flying Footer

Fighting
the Flying Footer

by Frida Nyvall

A “Flying Footer” is a footer that is not always placed at the bottom of the page. This article presents different solutions on how to place the footer at the bottom of a layout.

Footers that are not placed at the very bottom of the page, is one of my pet peeves when it comes to web design and layout.

”Flying Footers” occurs in layouts that has not enough CSS rules for placing the footer at the bottom at all times. For example, when there is not enough content on the page to take up 100% of the screen’s height, the footer might end before the page ends. This is typically occurring on larger screens when displaying pages that contain a smaller amount of content.

Examples

An example of a short page displayed on a large screen using the top-selling WordPress theme Avada.

Screenshot of a short page using WP theme Avada

Short page displayed on a large screen using the top-selling WordPress theme Avada.

Another example is this view from Sweden’s largest public service news and media company SVT.

Short webpage with flying footer on Sweden’s largest public service news and media company SVT

Short webpage with flying footer on Sweden’s largest public service news and media company SVT.

And yet another example from Sweden’s largest business news site, di.se.

Flying footer on a short webpage of Sweden’s largest business news site, di.se

Flying footer on a short webpage of Sweden’s largest business news site, di.se.


Is This Really Important?

Fixing details like this is in my opinion comparable to wearing an ironed shirt to an important meeting when you want to look your best. The world will not end if you show up in a wrinkled shirt, but you will probably make a better impression wearing an ironed one.

In the same way, caring about details, coherent design and making a solid impression can make a website appear to be of higher quality.

Dynamic Content

Most websites have dynamic content. It is preferable that the expected look of a website’s design is not relying on whether or not the content is long or short.

Larger Screens

There has been a lot of focus on mobile and smaller screens, but there has been a shift upwards in screen sizes as well. Screens used for accessing websites are getting larger; some users even browse the Internet on their TV screens. It is therefore needed to provide layouts that scale and stay in place on larger screens as well.


Join the Fight

Depending on which browser support is needed, as well as on the content of the footer itself, different techniques can be used to make the footer stay at the bottom of the page regardless of the page’s previous content.

Negative Margin

Applicable when: the footer height is known and will not change, and you need to support old browsers.

Browser support: supported in all browsers.

Although it is possible to combine CSS Computed Properties with a calc() statement to use this in a scenario with a changing footer height, those techniques are only supported in modern browsers. And if you are building for modern browsers only, you have the opportunity to use Flexbox or CSS Grid as well.

See the Pen Fighting the Flying Footer with margins by Frida Nyvall (@fridanyvall) on CodePen.

vh Units

Applicable when: the minimum footer height is decided, and you need support down to IE9.

Browser support: supported in old browsers back to IE9

Adding content to the footer so that it exceeds the set minimum height will trigger y-axis scrolling on the webpage (instead of adjusting for and making use of any extra space left above the footer). However, the footer will stay at the bottom of the page.

See the Pen Fighting the Flying Footer with vh units by Frida Nyvall (@fridanyvall) on CodePen.

Flexbox

Applicable when: you don’t need to support Internet Explorer versions. Can be used for dynamic footer content since the footer height can vary without breaking the layout.

Browser support: fully supported by Edge12 and upwards.

See the Pen Fighting the Flying Footer with Flexbox by Frida Nyvall (@fridanyvall) on CodePen.

CSS Grid

Applicable when: you don’t need to support Internet Explorer or Edge below 12. Can be used for dynamic footer content since the footer height can vary without breaking the layout.

Browser support: full support from Edge16 and up.

See the Pen Fighting the Flying Footer with CSS Grid by Frida Nyvall (@fridanyvall) on CodePen.

Note about Position Sticky

It is possible to place the footer at the bottom using position sticky, which is supported down to Edge 16. Even if the footer is placed at the bottom of the page, the drawback with using position sticky for footer positioning is that the footer will overlap previous content when y-axis scrolling is needed.

In this case, this might not be the desired behavior and hence position sticky might not be the best tool for the job.


In Summary

The main constraints that decide which technique is best for each use-case are:

  • Which browsers need to be supported?
  • Is the footer height known?
  • Will the footer height change (for example as a consequence of dynamic footer content)?

If you know you don’t need to support Internet Explorer, the technique with the best support is flexbox, which also allows for changing the footer height.

Tags

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